American English

Discuss this oxymoron in the comments below.


  • Chandrashekar

    first it didn't strike. then it hit me! :Dmost intelligent absurdity I've ever seen!

  • Jamempress

    top of the list

  • Jamempress

    top of the list

  • Shankran S

    please tell me how its an oxymoron

  • Rob Muirhead

    Two different nationalities;

    Also, English isn’t American

  • NobbySingh

    Ahhh… you must be American 🙂

  • ASDFGH

    Has anyone ever heard of the word “dialect”?

  • Mr. De k.

    2 different nationalities? Those are two different things, but not opposite. I’m not an expert on this, but this is not an oxymoron is it?

  • Howecom

    People from Germany speak German; If you’r from Spain your language is Spanish and of course if you’re from England your language is English. Other nationalities uses these languages for different reasons, the main one being a former colony of the origin of the country. Americans want their own language, sadly there is no language called “Americanish” and ‘American English” is an oxymoron . . .

  • Jonny Canuk

    American English spells and pronounces things differently

  • hassan

    it’s the same when u say english american

  • Guest

    I don’t understand this being an oxymoron. The three types of English I know most are American, Australian, and British English. There are different spellings, pronunciations, and words in these English varieties.

  • chandler

    I don’t understand this being an oxymoron. The three types of English I know most are American, Australian, and English (from England). There are different spellings, pronunciations, and words in these English varieties.

  • nbfdgs

    Yea, English and American aren’t opposites. Its probably a British example making fun of America.

  • RomanGodfrey

    English comes from England, and American is from America. They’re “too different places”. Even though English is actually just a language….

  • Farkov

    There is no “Australian” English. We speak English mongo.

  • Gillian Carr

    Except they’re different because in England you would say “favourite, colour, grey, labour” but in America you would say “favorite, color, gray, labor” so, therefore, American English isn’t an oxymoron, rather a classification